Harnessing Weather Data to Tell a Story

Amount of rainfall over a 7 day period in May 2018, as Subtropical Storm Alberto moved through the central part of the United States. Dark blues indicate over 8 inches of rainfall, which led to substantial flooding. Data Source:  PRISM Climate Group, Oregon State U

Amount of rainfall over a 7 day period in May 2018, as Subtropical Storm Alberto moved through the central part of the United States. Dark blues indicate over 8 inches of rainfall, which led to substantial flooding. Data Source: PRISM Climate Group, Oregon State U

 

Data access made easy

I have instantaneous access to weather information all over the globe. As a research meteorologist working on NOAA datasets for nearly a decade, I have access to over 40 petabytes, nearly 80,000 laptops worth, of weather data at my fingertips. Data access can be time consuming and tedious, however I have learned the tricks and trades to access data from NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) and can "slice and dice" to meet your needs.

Depending on the request, data can be provided at varying spatial scales, from global to neighborhood. Time scales can also vary from decadal averages to data reporting every minute. All data runs through rigorous quality assurance, and is certified by NCEI as the most accurate. Whatever weather data you need I can provide. Some examples include:

  • Over 100,000 land based weather stations reporting every hour.
  • Satellite data, geostationary and polar orbiting.
  • NEXRAD Radar Data.
  • Archived forecast and warnings from the National Weather Service.

Turn Data into actionable Results

Areas at risk to drought, using the Palmer Drought Severity Index (Citation: Palmer, 1965)

Areas at risk to drought, using the Palmer Drought Severity Index (Citation: Palmer, 1965)

Data access is just the start of my work. I am also proficient in analyzing the data to tell a story. Using the most sophisticated algorithms, I can analyze and visualize any weather data to meet your needs. I have built, authored, and presented numerous research datasets over my career, including:

  • An extreme snowfall database used by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for disaster relief.
  • A derived drought product for every US County, used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
  • Tools to analyze heat events, used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Society of Actuaries (SOA).

I also strive to stay up to date with the latest technologies. I am currently working towards a certificate in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and am beocoming proficient in big data analytics using Amazon's Web Service (AWS). For a more specific example of data analysis and visualization using GIS, check out my interactive map.